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Artist Award Scheme in focus: Lindsey Mendick, Louise Barrington, Madeleine Pledge and Nick Gordon

    Recently, the Henry Moore Foundation awarded more than £60,000 of funding to directly assist 40 artists in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Each week will be focusing on a selection of those artists and celebrating the work that they do.

    Lindsey Mendick

     

    “I'm so delighted to recieve the Henry Moore Foundation's Artist Award! This award will allow me the much needed financial support to continue making in this difficult and unpredicatable time. Thank you so much from the bottom of my heart!”

    Lindsey Mendick

    Autobiographical, self-deprecating and unashamedly female, the work of Lindsey Mendick tells stories of sex, lust, and body politics, defiant in their rejection of the male gaze. Primarily working in ceramics, she also embraces banner painting, sewing, metalwork, furniture making and sound within her practice.

    Mendick's tactile and skillful manipulation of clay creates an unruly and at times grotesque cast of characters, drawing inspiration from the mythical women of classical Greece as much as schlocky horror films and trash TV. Her self-described 'magpie-like affinity to popular culture' weaves together playful and garish imagery with moments of tenderness and introspection. Rich in both humour and vulnerability, her work enables viewers to explore their own personal histories, neuroses and fears in a cathartic and non-judgemental framework.

    Find out more: lindseymendick.com

    Louise Barrington

     

    “I’m absolutely delighted to receive the award, it will really make a difference. Covid has been a challenge presenting real obstacles to my creative practice, the award will allow me to continue to realise untapped ideas.”

    Louise Barrington

    Louise Barrington's work is grounded in the open landscapes of the Orkney Isles, resonating with the islands' in-between spaces and times: land, sea and sky; dawn, dusk and twilight. Her work, eschewing form and weight, gracefully translates line, colour and pattern into poetical considerations of space.

    The Zen concept of Ma, with its connotations of impermanence and empty space, is a thread that runs through Barrington's work. Translated into an understanding of the open landscape surrounding her, the void becomes a positive space for the projection of ideas and an expression of the limitlessness of possibilities.

    Find out more: louisebarrington.com

    Madeleine Pledge

     

    “From within this period of necessary withdrawal, this award comes as a very welcome support towards a tentative, much longed-for return to the studio. It will also support and sustain shared conversations and work I am participating in behind the scenes, the commonality of which feels particularly urgent at a time when so many of us have been pushed into positions of even greater precarity than usual.”

    Madeleine Pledge

    Working with textile and furniture design, Madeleine Pledge's practice is a discussion of the human body and our relationship to it. Though bodies are rarely, if ever, physically present in her work, traces of them permeate: discarded balaclavas, boots turned to face the wall, and vacant chairs allude to people once here or yet to arrive, activities just finished or about to start.

    Often working via replicas and remakes, Pledge uses the language of clothing and interiors as a way to interrogate our understanding of bodies, fashion and power.

    Find out more: madeleinepledge.com

    Nick Gordon

     

    “I’m very appreciative to receive this grant. This makes possible the creation of works/projects which otherwise would be very difficult at this current time.”

    Nick Gordon

    Scavenged, beachcombed, or stumbled across in a charity shop, Gordon has an instinct for collecting objects both natural and man-made. Driven by 'a love for materials and how things can fit together in satisfying ways', his work commonly combines these materials in mixed media collages that explore humanity's relationship with the environment.

    A contemporary reflection on historical collecting practices, Gordon's work examines the nature of arranging and analysing objects, and delves into the histories, fictions and folklore surrounding their display.