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Artist Award Scheme in focus: Anna Berry, Anne Vibeke Mou, Appau Jnr Boakye-Yiadom and Ashley Holmes

    Recently, the Henry Moore Foundation awarded more than £60,000 of funding to directly assist 40 artists in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Each week will be focusing on four of those artists and celebrating the work that they do.

    Anna Berry

     

    “Receiving this award from the Henry Moore Foundation’s Artist Award Scheme is something I appreciate greatly for several reasons. Not least is the financial help, desperately needed at this time. But also, being a self-taught outsider artist, to even be on the radar for something like this means a very great deal. Thank you so much!”

    Anna Berry

    Describing herself as 'a middle-aged, self-taught, disabled outsider', Anna Berry creates work that strives to be socially, politically and ethically conscious. She is most well known for her large-scale paper interventions; fragile and ephemeral, they are both sculpture and installation, activated by light, movement and performance.

    Berry's work is often concerned with how our sensory and cognitive experiences shape - and distort - our perception of reality, her interest stemming from 'living with a brain that works a little differently'. Whether dealing with politically charged topics, physics, or the chaos of reality, her work reflects on the complexity of the world from her unique perspective, always striving above all for honesty and authenticity.

    Find out more: annaberry.co.uk

    Anne Vibeke Mou

     

    “I make objects which embody the complexities of landscape by marrying place with time. Currently I am developing self-reliant ways of working that are environmentally low impact and do not require elaborate technical facilities.

    The Henry Moore award will help towards establishing a workshop, with an eye on portability, so I can continue my work with bespoke glass recipes on a modest scale at home and on site. I am planning to widen my use of botanical extractions and start to establish a ‘botany of glass’, which I imagine as a sculptural sequence of glass compositions, produced with a myriad of algae and plants from sea, shore and land.

    I am based in a historic area of Newcastle upon Tyne, where the industrial revolution began, and I am also thinking about elements which encompass this momentous cultural step and its consequences.”

    Anne Vibeke Mou

    Creating delicate and subtle artworks in the medium of glass, Anne Vibeke Mou's work is equal parts sculpture, drawing and alchemy. Her meticulous approach often utilises traditional and even obsolete techniques, yet equally she will craft new recipes, weaving botanical or fossilised elements into bespoke glass vessels. These painstaking processes and material transformations imbue her work with a dramatic sense of narrative, merging ancient landscapes, abandoned histories and contemporary contexts into something strikingly new.

    Find out more: annevibekemou.info

    Appau Jnr Boakye-Yiadom

     

    “Great Surprise! It couldn’t have come at a more needed time.”

    Appau Jnr Boakye-Yiadom

    Rhythm, sound, colour, movement... Appau Jnr Boakye-Yiadom's multilayered works are in a constant state of flux, 'unfinished and ongoing'. His installations often incorporate live elements that necessitate viewing in person: drumming, performance and dance all contribute to a collision of cultural narratives and bodily experiences. Resisting linear notions of 'origins', he instead emphasises that it is these interactions that drive cultural development.

    Find out more: boakye-yiadom.com

    Ashley Holmes

     

    “I am pleased to be one of the recipients of the award, it feels important to acknowledge the pressures and precarity for lots of people right now due to the pandemic. I am very grateful for the time and space the support will enable for me and my practice in the coming months.”

    Ashley Holmes

    A multidisciplinary artist and DJ, Ashley Holmes uses music as a medium to explore traditions of Black cultural production in Britain. He draws from a diverse archive of sonic influences, from reggae and hip hop to grime and drill, to open up conversations on the complexity of Black British identity.

    Alongside his art practice and teaching, Holmes also runs Open Deck, a space for collective listening and sharing of stories through music, and hosts the monthly radio show Tough Matter.

    Find out more: ashleyholmes.co.uk