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Artist Award Scheme in focus: Jasleen Kaur, Jill McKnight, Joanne Masding and Kathryn Ashill

    Recently, the Henry Moore Foundation awarded more than £60,000 of funding to directly assist 40 artists in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Each week will be focusing on a selection of those artists and celebrating the work that they do.

    Jasleen Kaur

     

    “Coming out of maternity leave into a pandemic has meant little headspace for creative thinking or strategising for the future. This award helps me carve out time and space to tend to my practice or funds to work collaboratively in a time of isolation.”

    Jasleen Kaur

    Jasleen Kaur's work is an ongoing exploration of the malleability of culture, looking at how rituals and traditions adapt over time and become deeply embedded within objects and materials. She works with sculpture, video, sound and writing.

    Her hybrid objects often draw simultaneously from both her personal, familial experiences and wider social histories: colonial India and its relationship to Britain, diasporic identity, Sikhism. He walked like he owned himself typifies this approach: the orange and blue tracksuit alludes to imagery of Sikh youths in '90s Britain, while the embroidered emblems of Sikh weaponry (replacing the Adidas stripes) reference designs from British Indian army uniforms.

    Find out more: jasleenkaur.co.uk

    Jill McKnight

     

    “I am thrilled to have been granted this award at this challenging time. Receiving the award will enable me to make creatively ambitious sculpture work at a time when other projects have been postponed, following on from being an Associate Artist for Yorkshire Sculpture International 2019. It is a great honour to have received the award from the Henry Moore Foundation and I am extremely grateful for the Foundation’s support.”

    Jill McKnight

    Using sculpture and installation as a means of storytelling, Jill McKnight explores working-class, feminist and artistic lineages, revealing otherwise lost or overlooked voices. Often playful, precarious and unpredictable, her works highlight the tension inherent to the ambiguous language of sculpture.

    McKnight was selected as one of Yorkshire Sculpture International's Associate Artists in 2019.

    Find out more: jillmcknight.com

    Joanne Masding

     

    “Receiving an artist’s award has provided invaluable support and encouragement during this period of uncertainty and I’m thrilled to be part of such a legacy of investment in artists. Many thanks to Henry Moore Foundation for what it will make possible.”

    Joanne Masding

    Joanne Masding makes that responds to our relationships with cultural objects, dealing with problems such how worth is attributed, value decided, ownership assigned and physical experience mediated; and how this translates to world where 'objects' are becoming increasingly digital, replicatable and immaterial.

    Find out more: joannemasding.com

    Kathryn Ashill

     

    Pursuing the theatrical in the everyday, Kathryn Ashill uses the DIY aesthetic of amateur dramatics, drag, and 'the body as a social tool' as a way to open up conversations with audiences. Often participatory or confrontational in nature, her performances explore topics such as gender identity, civic duty, and the culture clash between her working class background and artistic practice.

    Find out more: kathrynashill.com